AeroStar Saving Lives One Upset Recovery Training at a Time

Aircraft upset is a dangerous and potentially life-threatening condition in aircraft operations. It’s a situation in which the flight attitude or airspeed of an aircraft is outside the normal flight parameters for which it is designed. This may result in loss of control (LOC) of the aircraft and sometimes the total loss of the aircraft itself. Loss of control may be due to turbulent weather, pilot disorientation, or a system failure.

The FAA defines upset prevention and upset recovery training as: ”To prevent loss-of-control accidents due to aircraft upset after inadvertently entering an extreme or abnormal flight attitude.” An NTSB data compiled list determined that 3,051 lives were lost in 32 accidents in the years 1998–2015 due to LOC accidents.

Some recent crashes involving upset or loss of control include the infamous Colgan Air Flight 3407 which stalled and crashed killing all on board and Air France Flight 447 which entered a high altitude stall and crashed in the ocean.

Most recently, there was an Air Asia A320 crash that would have been totally preventable had the flight crew received upset recovery training. The pilots received an alert indicating a mechanical problem in the tail section that had been worked on recently. In an attempt to cancel the alert the Captain began to shut down computers and systems on the aircraft.
This caused the autopilot to remain engaged without the proper working data it would normally have access to. Soon the aircraft started to climb out of control. The panicked flight crew immediately disengaged the autopilot in an unusually nose high attitude with the pilot in the right seat pushing forward on the control column and the pilot in the left seat pulling back on the side stick.

Neither pilot had any indication what the other was doing. This caused the aircraft to remain in the attitude it was in before the flight crew attempted to override the autopilot. The aircraft eventually stalled and spiraled out of control, crashing into the sea and killing everyone on board. Again, this accident was totally preventable if the A320 crew had been trained in upset recovery.

A friend of mine who has been flying the A320 since 1999 told me that Airbus had actually published a memo in 2000 to all Airbus operators on the subject of training for unusual attitude or upset recovery in the simulator.

The memo basically said that unusual attitude training should not be taught in A320 simulators since, they claimed, that a theoretical knowledge of Jet Upset recovery techniques is all that is needed. That was rather like saying to a child, “I won’t teach you how to swim but I will train you not to go near the water!”

The rationale for the memo appears to be that because aerodynamic forces associated with Jet Upset cannot be reproduced with proper fidelity in a simulator, it is therefore considered negative training. Alternatively, the aircraft’s sophisticated computers & fly-by wire technology would never let that situation occur to begin with.

We now know this to be entirely false. In the Air Asia accident the pilots caused a chain reaction by shutting off systems. By doing so, they inadvertently caused the aircraft to continue flying on the autopilot without proper data input. This confused the aircraft’s auto pilot and caused it to pitch nose up and climb out of control. The rest is history.

In addition, G forces cannot be reproduced in an airliner simulator. But the flight instrument indications of a Jet Upset are easily demonstrated. An inverted nose low attitude will reproduce quite normally on the ADI; the airspeed and altimeter readings would also work as expected. I have observed this many times in another type aircraft simulator.

In 2004, the NTSB issued a formal Safety Recommendation which requested the FAA to require all airlines to provide simulator training for flight crews that would enable them to recognize and recover from “unusual attitudes and upset maneuvers.

This would include upsets that occur while the aircraft is being controlled by automatic flight control systems, as well as unusual attitudes that result from flight control malfunctions and uncommanded flight control surface movements.

The new FAA rules were finalized in 2010, requiring specific training for pilots to recover from aircraft upset incidents. New training programs are now known under the term “advanced maneuver – upset recovery training.”

Since 2008, AeroStar Training Services has recognized the critical value of Upset Recovery Training. AeroStar is a FAA Part 142 training center that provides Type Rating Training in the Boeing 737 classic, the B737 NG, the A320 series & the ATP CTP. AeroStar was founded for Airline pilots by Airline Captains who want to provide Higher Quality, Affordable Type Rating and ATP CTP Training.

Each program includes ground and full flight level D simulator training in airplane upset recovery techniques. This includes stalls, nose-high, wings-level recovery techniques as well as nose-low, wings-level recovery techniques.

Additional training consists of the use of nose down elevator, use of bank angle, thrust reduction, nose low recovery, accelerated stall demonstrations, high bank and inverted flight. AeroStar trains for upset recovery techniques and many other upset situations that most programs do not include.

This higher level of training ensures that AeroStar’s pilot training graduates are among the safest in the skies, ready to face and overcome any cockpit situation that may arise, thus ensuring the safety of the passengers and crew.

*U.S DOT, FAA Advisory Circular 11/24/15 Subject: Stall Prevention and Recovery Training
* This article incorporates public domain material from the Federal Aviation Administration document “http://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/airline_operators/training/media/AP_UpsetRecovery_Book.pdf”.

AeroStar Saving Lives One Upset Recovery Training at a Time

Aircraft upset is a dangerous and potentially life-threatening condition in aircraft operations. It’s a situation in which the flight attitude or airspeed of an aircraft is outside the normal flight parameters for which it is designed. This may result in loss of control (LOC) of the aircraft and sometimes the total loss of the aircraft itself. Loss of control may be due to turbulent weather, pilot disorientation, or a system failure.

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent=”yes” overflow=”visible”][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”]

AeroStar Upset Recovery Training by Bryan Pilcher
AeroStar Upset Recovery Training

The FAA defines upset prevention and upset recovery training as:”To prevent loss-of-control accidents due to aircraft upset after inadvertently entering an extreme or abnormal flight attitude.” An NTSB data compiled list determined that 3,051 lives were lost in 32 accidents in the years 1998–2015 due to LOC accidents.

Some recent crashes involving upset or loss of control include the infamous Colgan Air Flight 3407 which stalled and crashed killing all on board and Air France Flight 447 which entered a high altitude stall and crashed in the ocean.

Most recently, there was an Air Asia A320 crash that would have been totally preventable had the flight crew received upset recovery training. The pilots received an alert indicating a mechanical problem in the tail section that had been worked on recently. In an attempt to cancel the alert the Captain began to shut down computers and systems on the aircraft. This caused the autopilot to remain engaged without the proper working data it would normally have access to. Soon the aircraft started to climb out of control. The panicked flight crew immediately disengaged the autopilot in an unusually nose high attitude with the pilot in the right seat pushing forward on the control column and the pilot in the left seat pulling back on the side stick.

Neither pilot had any indication what the other was doing. This caused the aircraft to remain in the attitude it was in before the flight crew attempted to override the autopilot. The aircraft eventually stalled and spiraled out of control, crashing into the sea and killing everyone on board. Again, this accident was totally preventable if the A320 crew had been trained in upset recovery.

A friend of mine who has been flying the A320 since 1999 told me that Airbus had actually published a memo in 2000 to all Airbus operators on the subject of training for unusual attitude or upset recovery in the simulator.

The memo basically said that unusual attitude training should not be taught in A320 simulators since, they claimed, that a theoretical knowledge of Jet Upset recovery techniques is all that is needed. That was rather like saying to a child, “I won’t teach you how to swim but I will train you not to go near the water!”

The rationale for the memo appears to be that because aerodynamic forces associated with Jet Upset cannot be reproduced with proper fidelity in a simulator, it is therefore considered negative training. Alternatively, the aircraft’s sophisticated computers & fly-by wire technology would never let that situation occur to begin with.

We now know this to be entirely false. In the Air Asia accident the pilots caused a chain reaction by shutting off systems. By doing so, they inadvertently caused the aircraft to continue flying on the autopilot without proper data input. This confused the aircraft’s auto pilot and caused it to pitch nose up and climb out of control. The rest is history.

In addition, G forces cannot be reproduced in an airliner simulator. But the flight instrument indications of a Jet Upset are easily demonstrated. An inverted nose low attitude will reproduce quite normally on the ADI; the airspeed and altimeter readings would also work as expected. I have observed this many times in another type aircraft simulator.

In 2004, the NTSB issued a formal Safety Recommendation which requested the FAA to require all airlines to provide simulator training for flight crews that would enable them to recognize and recover from “unusual attitudes and upset maneuvers.

This would include upsets that occur while the aircraft is being controlled by automatic flight control systems, as well as unusual attitudes that result from flight control malfunctions and uncommanded flight control surface movements.

The new FAA rules were finalized in 2010, requiring specific training for pilots to recover from aircraft upset incidents. New training programs are now known under the term “advanced maneuver – upset recovery training.”

Since 2008, AeroStar Training Services in Florida has recognized the critical value of Upset Recovery Training. AeroStar is a FAA Part 142 training center that provides Type Rating Training in the Boeing 737 classic, the B737 NG, the A320 series & the ATP CTP. AeroStar was founded for Airline pilots by Airline Captains who want to provide Higher Quality, Affordable Type Rating and ATP CTP Training.

Each program includes ground and full flight level D simulator training in airplane upset recovery techniques. This includes stalls, nose-high, wings-level recovery techniques as well as nose-low, wings-level recovery techniques.

Additional training consists of the use of nose down elevator, use of bank angle, thrust reduction, nose low recovery, accelerated stall demonstrations, high bank and inverted flight. AeroStar trains for upset recovery techniques and many other upset situations that most programs do not include.

This higher level of training ensures that AeroStar’s pilot training graduates are among the safest in the skies, ready to face and overcome any cockpit situation that may arise, thus ensuring the safety of the passengers and crew.

*U.S DOT, FAA Advisory Circular 11/24/15 Subject: Stall Prevention and Recovery Training
* This article incorporates public domain material from the Federal Aviation Administration document “http://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/airline_operators/training/media/AP_UpsetRecovery_Book.pdf”.

 

[/fusion_builder_column][fusion_builder_column type=”1_1″ background_position=”left top” background_color=”” border_size=”” border_color=”” border_style=”solid” spacing=”yes” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” padding=”” margin_top=”0px” margin_bottom=”0px” class=”” id=”” animation_type=”” animation_speed=”0.3″ animation_direction=”left” hide_on_mobile=”no” center_content=”no” min_height=”none”]

Bryan Pilcher Aviation Writer
Bryan Pilcher is a Pilot and Aviation Writer at AeroStar Training Services in Orlando, Florida

[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Sunny Skies Forecasted for B737 & A320 Family of Aircraft

Boeing launched its 737 family of jets in 1964, and since then the company has snagged over 13,000 firm orders for the plane. Airbus launched its competitor single-aisle, narrow-body family, the A320, in March 1984 and claims over 12,000 orders since the A320’s launch. The huge success and high demand for these two aircraft is only increasing.

Narrow-bodies dominate, and continue to be the fastest growing and largest segment of new aircraft orders. The fight is between the B737 family and the A320 will require 26,730 aircraft over the next 20 years. About 35 % of the single-aisle planes are expected to be acquired by Low Cost Carriers.

Airbus 320 and Boeing 737 families are and will remain the most popular aircraft types in the world in the foreseeable future, followed by Boeing 777 and Airbus 330. However, the regional jet market is likely to face a 20% decline by 2020, maintaining the trend at least till 2030, according to Boeing.

The airlines will be naturally forced to expand their cooperation with training organizations like AeroStar Training Services in Kissimmee, Florida who have special type rating programs for the Boeing 737 & Airbus A320 family of aircraft.

Aircraft
Bryan Pilcher, AeroStar Type Ratings

*statistical data courtesy of Halldale Media

Do you have WIA or VA benefits?

VA Benefits, WIA Benefits

 

Did You Know?

AeroStar Training Service is approved for WIA and VA benefits and programs in Kentucky and Central Florida!

Contact us to find out how you could apply those benefits to acquire a type rating, a ATP-CTP certificate, or other advanced training!

RAA Convention Update – Future Pilot Career Outlook

We recently returned from the RAA convention and are very encouraged about the prospects for pilots starting airline careers.

The Regional Airlines (members of the RAA) are an important career step for many of AeroStar’s former students as they graduate to legacy carriers and wide-body pilot positions. Advancing through the ranks at a regional airline can set you apart from other candidates applying for Captain or First Officer positions at larger, more prestigious carriers.

Many regional airlines have realized that they need to provide additional incentives to attract quality candidates. Those incentives may come in the form of sign-on bonuses, training opportunities, and other incentives that make these positions more attractive than they may have been in the past.

 

Airline Pilot Career Workshop – A Second Career for 55+ Pilots?

Airline Pilot Workshop - 55+ Pilots?Paula Williams –

Fantastic. And Jim from Brazil says he was flying a B737. He’s a Hawker 400 captain now jet, jet transition instructor. Okay, I guess that wasn’t really a question, so we’ll move on. Let’s see, and here’s another one.

I’m 52 years old, I’ve always dreamed of flying.

 30 years ago I took some, took the theoretical courses in France. Today I train with the flight simulator, is it too late for me to make a career as a pilot now? This is Robin from Guinea.

Captain David Santo –

So Robin I never think it’s too late, the current retirement age is 65. I know that at my airline, we have hired new hires that have been 60. I don’t know whether there’s been anybody hired older than that, but I believe so. So, you really, you know, the, the clock is ticking.

So to get some years of experience in, you really need to do everything you can do right now to pad your logbook, build your time. But if you were hired by 55. So that gives you two or three years, of really getting all of your time built up, your experience built up, you will have ten solid years to work as a airline pilot.

Now after that ten years mandatory retirement at 65. As it looks today, and that might change it might go up. So, you could ride that, that bow wave if it does, but retired airline pilots, still have the opportunity to do things like ferry airplanes. They do maintenance flights, and they also become Sim instructors.

So, I would say absolutely Robin if this is something you wanna do don’t wait, come on over the water’s fine and I think you’ll have a good time doing it.

 

Pilot Jobs – Moving Back to the US from Overseas

back to the us from overseasPaula Williams –

Great. Robert from Oklahoma has, is looking at moving back to the US from overseas, he’s rated in the B737 and A320 and looking to do the ATP on his Airbus certificate and get a job.

Captain David Santo –

So all great goals, and I think it’s I’d love to hear where Robert has been but welcome back Robert, it’s a good time to come back. 142 school like Arrowstar, can do your ATP CTP the new prerequisite for the written. If you don’t already have it, if you already have the written. You can attend a typewriting course based on your experience, add the typewriting and as long as you meet all the prerequisites set by the FAA we can get the ATP certificate check done at the exact same time. That gives you for example in our program, if you attend a standard type rating, that gives you 28 hours of jet multi-engine instrument time, because we use full flight level D simulators.

So it counts as actual twin, counts as jet, counts as instrument, multi-crew time. That can go towards the new 50 hour requirement for your ATP. And we can do the check rides combined with no additional cost. So it’s a great way, to pad your log book with some extra jet time.

Get a type writing on your license, that never goes away. And add that ATP certificate that you absolutely need now to get a job in the US.

Paula Williams –

And save some money at the same time, so you don’t have to do those separately.

Captain David Santo –

Well, that’s right, I mean, I think a lot of people don’t understand too the fact that if you do a type rating and your type rating is $13,000, $15,000. But you’re getting 28 hours of twin jet time out of it. Take the amount of money it costs to rent a twin, if anybody will rent you one  And multiply that out. Pretty soon the type rating is a pretty cheap option to do, a time builder, to get a type rating that’s on your license that never expires and add your ATP.

Paula Williams –

Right here’s another one on the theme of moving forward to the US,what airlines running A320s would be the best to apply for overseas crew for their first USA based airline, with an endorsement

Captain David Santo –

So I, so first I would like to say that we’ve worked with a whole lot of pilots from Australia we’ve done a lot of training at Aerostar under Casa. And have done that very successfully. A lot of our Australian customers are affiliated with Tiger Airways which is an A320 operation in Australia.

So what airlines running A320s would the best to apply for overseas, for overseas crews? Well, to work in the US, you have to have a green card or you have to be a US citizen. So no US airline is going to be able to hire you based on the current laws, unless you have either a green card or you are a US citizen.

Once you have that almost every major airline in the United States operates airbuses. The only one that comes to mind that does not, is Southwest Airlines. But if you think of every other major airline in the U.S, they all operate Airbuses now. Outside the U.S. certainly Australian Casa-qualified pilots have been in big demand on the Pacific Rim.

So any of the Asian countries on the Pacific Rim. Big demand for Australian pilots.

Airline Pilot Careers – The Time Building Conundrum Part I

low timeQuestions from aspiring pilots about the “Time Building Conundrum”

Paula Williams –

All right Eduardo from Spain says I would like to earn a B737 type rating. I have an an ATPL, well I’ll let you read all the letters there.

And I would like to know what is the best, easiest, and least expensive way to obtain the type with Aerostar.

Captain David Santo –

Okay, well and it’s not just with Aerostar it’s gonna be with any 142 school we certainly appreciate your business, but we want you to look at every other option and see what’s best for you. First of all EASA. You’ve had some wonderful training. EASA’s very well recognized as being a great organization for requiring a lot from their pilots.

The first step is to go to www.faa.gov and apply for validation of your current experience. Once you get your current experience validated, then you need to think about the written examination. Do you have valid ATP written exam results? If you don’t, the FAA has recently passed a new requirement for the airline transport pilot certification training program.

Very similar to the EASA Multi Crew Coordination course. You do need to take that course regardless of your experience. Right now, there is no waiver for it. So a 142 school like Aerostar can offer you that course. That then get you the prerequisite met to take the ATP written.

Once you’ve got the ATP written done, you’ve got your validation of all your experience, you’ve met all the logbook requirements for the ATP. Come over and do a type rating course with us. And out of that type rating course, we’ll be able to add the ATP certificate. And the A370 or 737 type rating are all in one one checkride.

 

Paula Williams –

Great. Here’s one from  Fourati from Tunisia as you know airlines do not hire any pilots with low hours and there’s a lot of jobless cadet pilots type rating costs a lot and is not terribly affordable profession must work on a solution.

So first of all, I would agree with you. I wish there was a better solution for the industry. Although this is an age-old problem. This is the exact same problem that I had when I was coming up through the ranks. Nobody would hire you without multi-engine time.

And nobody would give you multi-engine time to get hired. And yet, we all made it. So how did we all make the leap? If we all made the leap, you can make the leap too. Now first of all, I’m gonna push back on you. And say airlines do hire low time pilots.

If you don’t think they do, go look in Asia. Go look at VietJet. Go look at Indonesia. Go look at China. Go to the websites for the aviation recruiters, like Rishworth or VOR Holdings. For the first time ever, they’re starting to actively hire first officers. But in your particular region of the world, it may be true.

It may be true that there isn’t gonna be a low time pilot job opportunity. So what are you willing to do to pursue the career? Are you willing to go to Asia and fly for a while? If that’s your option, boy, I would jump on that. What a great experience, it’d be a great adventure.

And when you come back, you’re going to be the top of the stack. Cuz you’re going to have lots of experience. Do I agree there needs to be a better solution? I do. I don’t have the answer for that. I’m just trying to provide the solutions that work within the, the context of what we have in the industry now.

Paula Williams –

Right. So you just look at the cards you’re dealt and play them the best you can. And sometimes you have to go somewhere else to get better cards. [LAUGH].

Captain David Santo –

And, and, and I do wanna reassure, all of us did it. I had 250 hours once. Every single one of those airline pilots the 50 some thousand that we saw on the previous table, had 250 hours once. We all made the leap, and you can too.

Paula Williams –

Right. And here’s a real similar question 265 hours and a commercial ME and a Type Rating.

Captain David Santo  –

So what can you do? So Pablo, there’s a couple different pathways. Number one, there’s flight instruction, that’s the old proven pathway to build time is to get a flight instructor job. And the good news is, the schools right now are losing their flight instructors at an alarming rate So there are opportunities to go instruct. It’s a great way to give something back to the industry. It’s a great way for you to build your experience. And nothing teaches you how to fly better than helping to teach somebody else. However, if you don’t want to do the flight instructing route, there’s still other routes out there.

There’s banner flying. There’s towing gliders. There’s flying bank checks. There’s freight jobs out there in single engine and twin engine airplanes. There’s the commuters. Right now, you can’t get on with a commuter, by the way, until you have 1,500 hours, so you got to build some time to get to those.

The other thing is I was saying to the previous question. There are job opportunities outside the United States. And you should consider those. If you have the ability to travel to Asia and to work in the Asian market, you might actually be able to land a job flying an Airbus or a Boeing.

It’s not going to be easy. You’re gonna have to go beat on doors and make your own opportunities. But nothing worthwhile in life is gonna come easy. It’s all gonna take a lot of effort and work, so keep your options open. There are a number of venues out there, there are a number of avenues out there to build time.

The first thing is build your single engine time to get to that 1,500 hours and get your ATP. Once you get your ATP, I really think you’re gonna be snapped up very quickly by the commuters.

Pilot Careers – Regionals to Majors

From our Airline Pilot Career Workshop – Drew from Virginia asks – “I’m at a regional and looking to take the next step!”

Moving from the regionals to majors is a big key to success in an airline career.


Paula Williams

 

Fantastic. Alright, Drew from Virginia says, I’m at a regional and looking to take the next step. Well Drew if you’re at a regional right now, congratulations because I think you’re in a great position. The regionals actually are going to be struggling to find qualified pilots to backfill because the airlines are hiring so many of the regional pilots.

David Santo

And you guys are actually the best prepared. To make that next step. And I would say best prepared, here in the US. Of course those folks that went overseas, and are flying Air Buses and Boeing’s, they’re coming back, very well prepared too. To take the next step I would say be.

Be persistent in applying, the squeaky wheel gets the oil so you need to actively prove to the airline that you’re applying to that you’re a good candidate. One of the biggest mistakes that I’ve experienced from helping young men and women pursue this career. Is they put out an application and, and they think well it’s all on auto pilot form here.

It’s not. You’ve got to be updating your application as frequently as possible. You’ve got to be updating your hours. You’ve got to be going to the job fairs. You’ve got to be making yourself. The squeaky wheel. Getting yourself to the top of the application pool. Anything you can do to increase your professional standing too.

If you’re already typed in the RJ or the ERJ or the aircraft that you’re flying, that’s great, if you’ve completed your ATP, which I’m sure you have, those are things that are, clearly going to help you. You should consider whether a typewriting would help you to get on with an airline Jet Blue, With Spirit, With Virgin.

How much are you willing to invest now to make that next step sooner, so that you can get the bigger return on investment.

How To Be A Great Pilot

Career Advice

Career Advice: Captain David Santo answers questions from our Airline Career Workshop.

Paula Williams

Fantastic. Well, let’s dive into the questions, and I know you’ve already kind of answered some of these, but, you know, we can kind of apply what you’ve talked about already to these questions. And if you want me to flip back to any of these slides while we’re doing this, we certainly can.

We’ll start off with a really general one. Abdullah from Vermont wants to know what advice do you have to be a good pilot?

 How to be a great pilot?

David Santo

I think being a good pilot is being a risk mitigator. And anything you can do to mitigate risk. And that means, really studying constantly being prepared, take good care of yourself both mentally and physically. So that when the time arises and you need to deal with problems, you can deal with them methodically, systematically to make sure that you keep your aircraft and your passengers safe.

Paula Williams

Right, excellent. Emre from Turkey. I don’t know if I’m saying that correctly so I apologize if that is not right. How many hours can a pilot fly in a day? What are the limitations, daily and monthly and how many days does a pilot work in a month? I know we touch, just talked about that a little bit.

David Santo

So it does change regionally and I can’t speak to all the different regions. Even in the US now it’s a little bit of a formula because it’s based on what time of the day you started your schedule. But for a two-pilot crew, you’re limited to between eight and nine hours of flight time a day.

And you’re limited to somewhere between 12 and 16 hours of duty time a day. Duty meaning that, you are at work, flight time meaning you’re physically, taxiing out, flying the aircraft, or taxiing in. Now that’s the daily limitation. Weekly is. Approximately. It’s changed a little bit with the new rules.

Approximately 100 hours a month and it’s approximately 1000 hours, per year limitations.